clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Texas Tech Red Raiders vs Oklahoma Sooners | Key Match-Up

New, 5 comments

The Sooners have a chink in their armor but will the Red Raiders take advantage?

Ryan Gosling...er...Kliff Kingsbury, Head Coach Texas Tech
Ryan Gosling...er...Kliff Kingsbury, Head Coach Texas Tech
Michael C. Johnson-USA TODAY Spo

Heading into tomorrow, the Oklahoma Sooners find themselves as a seven point favorite over the Texas Tech Red Raiders. It is no secret that Kliff Kingsbury is in the running for Big XII Coach of the Year due to his surprising success in his first season with the program. At 7-0, there is much on the line as they travel to Norman.

Key Match-Up

Texas Tech Game Plan vs Oklahoma Strength/Weakness

The Red Raiders have gained recognition for their ability to spread the ball around through the air. Though the coaching staff is down an option for starting quarterback, this is a mentality that continues to prevail. Davis Webb took over the starting role and earned player of the week honors with a 400+ yard passing day.  Of course, Jace Amaro has proven to be a larger than life target for the young quarterback. Regardless of the opponent, Amaro is the type of player that must always be accounted for. Tech currently ranks second in the nation at 416.4 passing yards per game behind Oregon St.

However, this air raid will be up against the best statistical passing defense in the nation. Currently, the Sooners give up an average of 149.7 yards per game through the air. In the most recent win, OU allowed a mere 16 passing yards during the duration of the game. If the opponent chooses to throw all day while refusing to force the defense to respect the run, it could be a long and frustrating afternoon.

So where is the weakness, the point of attack?

Anyone who has watched Oklahoma football these past few weeks will be quick to point out that is is the rushing defense. A look at the Oklahoma loss to the Texas Longhorns reveals a total of 255 yards given up on the ground. Could it have been an anomaly? The following week, the Kansas Jayhawks gained 185 yards rushing the ball. Without Jordan Phillips to clog the middle and Corey Nelson directing traffic, this is a defense that has been exposed.

The Red Raiders are throwing the ball 54 times a game to 34 rushing attempts. Pitting strength against strength is usually not the most viable option. Knowing that the Sooners are struggling to stop the run up the middle, the question shifts to: will Kingsbury adapt his offense in order to "steal" a win?

More from Crimson And Cream Machine: